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, thank you. >>> breaking news. in the morning a health scare for former president george w. bush. during his annual physical yesterday, doctors found a blockage in an artery. this morning, president bush had a stent to open that blockage. he is supposedly in good spirits and eager to return to a normal schedule. and we have home insurance. but if we made a claim, our rate would go up... [ whispering ] shhh. you did it right. you have allstate claim rate guard so your rates won't go up just because of a claim. [ whispering ] are we still in a dream? no, you're in an allstate commercial. so get allstate home insurance with claim rate guard... [ whispering ] goodnight. there are so many people in our bedroom. [ dennis ] talk to an allstate agent... [ doorbell rings ] ...and let the good life in. (announcer) flavors talk tthis delicious gent... are worth searching for. friskies. feed the senses. >>> alex rodriguez. >> chicago fans let alex rodriguez have it as he returned from the disabled list and made his 2013 season debut for the new york yankees the same day he got slapped with major lea
in america voted for president obama, they thought finally george bush is leaving, no more bush, no more unilateral wars but what is president obama doing? exactly what president bush did. >> the u.n. inspectors left a hotel in damascus on friday apparently heading for inspection sites. they plan to leave syria on saturday morning shortening their stay. a resident of damascus says people are stocking up on food and moving away from military facilities out of concerns of possible military attacks. >>> a u.s. television network says the united states has proof that top syrian military officials discussed last week's chemical weapons attack after it reportedly took place. cnn says they intercepted telephone conversations form the basis for the u.s. conclusion that the syrian government was behind the attack. cnn quotes u.s. officials as saying the conversations show discussing the chemical attack in detail. they also said officers said it would be wise to refrain from launching more chemical attacks in the future because of the attention it was drawing. u.s. defense secretary chuck hagel sa
disgusted in a whole parade of traders, and that includes john mccain, lindsey graham, george bush, who has sponsored the center in texas, and i suffered through two hours of propaganda out of the bush center, and they treat america as a whorehouse. stephen moore treats america like a whorehouse. it is not about the money. c-span keeps playing all of these people. i want to see some balance. one thing mentioned at the george bush center from the hispanic chamber of commerce guy, he was lobbing these wonderful hispanic companies. have any of them enrolled in either a five so they will be true to the 1986 amnesty, which, at that point, required all employers verify eligibility by these workers. they have not done it. we have george bush, mccain, they have done nothing but subvert the law for the last 25 years, and they are trying to put the nail in our coffin now. i would like to see more balance from c-span. there was a wonderful march for jobs in washington dc. i have seen none of that on c- span. i would love to see that. jeb, much loved in alabama, he was the speaker of the conference. th
of george w. bush. thank you for the invitation. thunder a little bit when you talk about four percent growth year it i would add to what you said, that i do not think we can accomplish four percent growth without immigration. it is a precondition to get to that higher growth rate. it may be too low. we are in the fourth leader -- year of non-recovery. there is no reason the economy cannot he recovering much faster than it is geared five, six, or seven percent growth. it is interesting, if you look at the time i called the quarter-century of spectacular, unprecedented growth in america, 2005 -- 1980 two 2005 -- to 2005. let in well over 200 americans in that time. badle say immigration is for the economy or it causes high unemployment. the actual evidence shows the opposite, that the biggest boom. of american history was the greatest in immigration. it is circumstantial evidence. a second point is with respect to state. it is so interesting. we do a lot of work at the wall street journal. comparing texas to california, it is a good comparison if you are from texas and believe in the fr
w. bush -- >> in washington -- >> george w. bush had nancy pelosi as speaker of the house in 2007 and 2008, go back and look at what george w. bush did. when 80% of americans and probably 95% of people in the house were against the surge in iraq, you know what george bush said, we're going to do a surge in iraq. guess what? he got it through. he pushed it through. >> he had a relationship. >> he brow beat them. >> he talked to her. >> they talked to them, but they also pushed it through. it's not easy. >> you think that was his relationships or cheneys? >> i think cheney said things to members of the united states senate that did not -- >> alex is mad. >> coming up on "morning joe" -- >> what did he say to leahy? go -- yourself. i love that guy. i am not a shamed to say i love dick cheney. >> whoa. >> does that jar you too? >> excuse me? >> listen, you're jarred by all of these great americans i love. let me tell you something -- >> oh, my god. i just want to get to a break. >> do what you want to do. i will not sit here while you tear down the united states of america. j gentleme
. there are all kinds of safeguards built into this. i remember george bush, when he talked about this program, when it was first revealed by the new york times. he said, when al qaeda calls somebody in the united states, i want to know who they are calling. that is kind of the underlying philosophy of this program. talking again -- it always intends to spill over into people thinking, maybe we are monitoring the actual content of their conversations, is we are not all stop this metadata. it is effectively the outside of the envelope that is put in your mailbox. it is that information that is on the envelope. and the date stamp in the postage stamp. would you have people believe that metadata has no significant privacy interest? i would rather, if i had a choice -- i hope not to have either of these choices -- of having every phone conversation i have for 30 days listens to, which is impractical, to have a large number of people doing all my metadata collected for 30 days. i would much rather. >> if it was collected by proctor and gamble or colgate, i would be worried. sometimes, we do not thi
-span: do you think people would be surprised you voted for george bush in 1980? >> guest: i suppose so because i think the most surprised person would probably be president bush. write to what what you think you'd be surprised? >> guest: well i think most presidents get sensitive about the post and "newsweek" as well and he had his issues with us but i think any president does. but i suspect he would not think i voted for him. c-span: give us a thumbnail sketch of the post today. how many newspapers and television stations? how big is said and what is the revenue on a yearly basis? >> guest: we are about ad 1.6 million in annual revenues and the company holds mainly "the washington post" and we have a small newspaper the herald and half of the international "herald tribune" and may have "newsweek" and six television stations and 1.5 million cable connections, and we also have -- which is our medium of "the washington post" web site. c-span: are you still chairman of the executive committee? -- committee. >> guest: i am. c-span: how long were you chairman of "the washington post"? >> gu
believe the economy was so messed up by george bush that obama struggled mightily to overcome this horrible situation he inherited. the second reason is most americans believe republicans only care about rich people. and those are branding problems that the republican party has to to overcome. and it's hard to overcome it because you've got three obstacles; academia, hollywood and our major media, all of which are overwhelmingly liberal. when you say something, it's got to be interpreted through the filter of those three entities, and often it's been distorted. >> host: larry elder is our guest, this is booktv on c-span2 live from the los angeles times festival of books, campus of usc. mike's in fort worth, texas. hi, mike. >> caller: how's it going, larry? my -- pretty good. i'm a african-american democrat, but i agree with you one of the big problems in the african-american community is lack of fathers in the house. but i think, larry, when you say that, you kind of come off kind of harsh on black people. now, what's the reason behind the lack of a lot of fathers being in th
of the -- you could -- does the ghost of tony blair and george w. bush and saddam hussein hung heavily over parliament? >> absolutely. in all the -- not just skepticism, almost cynicism about the what the government says about the intelligence was the back drop. it's larger than that. i think something has been going on for years, if not decades in europe, gradual weakening of commitment to defense, preoccupation of -- >> what do you make of o-- ow hm france saying we need a political solution. i would love france to come forward with this magic political solution. this is like richard nixon's secret plan to end vietnam in 1968. there's not one. >> exactly. there's not going to be a political solution to syria. syria sill in the relatively early phases over a prolonged civil war. what's interesting about britain, a country that distanced itself from europe over economic issues and now distancing itself from the united states over strategic issues. this is small britain, small europe. we've ended the era -- >> why is that? how does europe find itself in a position or britain where it's separ
for the george bush administration to protect us from the terrorists. createdthe scandal they by the republicans so they can take points from the democrats won the elections come. from twitter says what is needed is a clear personal data law. kirk is up next from pittsburgh, pennsylvania. on the democrats line -- caller: good morning. would 100% advocate for this nsa program and others like it, if only they would truly concentrate on the real terrorist. this is to belittle what occurred on 9/11 or happened at the boston marathon, but there are tens of thousands of americans that die every year. tot is due to corporate ceos pollute our rivers and streams and even our ocean. did in the gulf of mexico, and here in pennsylvania we have more super clean up sites. the name ofdone in greed versus gluttony. relate that to the surveillance program. survey these corporations, who are murdering tens of thousands of people , get the goods on them, arrest them, try them, and sentence them or execute him for the crimes they are committee. host: will from columbia, tennessee. caller: good morning. thank you c-
council approve as has happened before, president george bush with iraq and president bill clinton with the co kosovo bombing in 1999. >>> live to the state department with an update from there. >> good avenue. we want to emphasize state department officials, white house officials, pentagon officials are emphasizing both on the record and privately that the commander in chief, president obama, has not yet made any decision about the action the united states is going to take in syria beyond the fact there will be an action. sources tell me the likely targtsz of the u.s. campaign will include the delivery systems for bashar al assad's chemicalarsenal. we are said to be striking command facilities located in damascus but also syria short range missile launches looking to conduct strikes against those targets. i'm told bashar al assad's presidential palace, some of the governmental military locations in damascus will not be targeted because a lot of key systems have been evacuated. a lot of artillery positions in the syrian government are located in mountains outside the city and those
george w. bush had surgery today after doctors found a blockage in an artery in his heart. that's according to the former president's spokesman, he says doctors discovered the blockage during a routine physical exam yesterday and today they inserted a stint. a piece of wire measure to mesh to keep the arteries open. spokesman says bush 43 should be out of the hospital tomorrow and back to his normal schedule by thursday. doctors tell us the former president has no history of heart trouble and by all accounts he is in excellent shape. few months ago he led his annual bike ride with wounded veterans covering more than 60 miles in three days. trace gallagher is live for us now. what do we know about who performed this stint and what's to come? >> well, it was quickly performed because we spoke to a cardiologist today shep that says couple things going on here one the president likely showed up to his annual exam and there was significant blockage in one his arteries and they felt it needed to be addressed right await a minute they also point out he is the former president and very
collar. caller: do you know the reasoning kind why george bush -- behind why george bush wanted to sell our ports? not know you member this. i think he is referring to 2004, the dubai company wanted to buy a port in the united states. guest: i certainly remember that. guest: we believe in privatizing the ports here. i think in the full length of time i decided to keep the state owned. host: what does that mean? i believe wasler referring to when there was discussion here locally about actually selling the port to a .oreign company that came to a full halt. i thought that was the right thing at the time. host: what does this mean to you that this is a state owned entity? guest: it is run and the public good. if it is privately own you have to maximize short-term profit. with government owned we can look at the long-term benefits to the commonwealth of virginia. that is why i am delighted that we do not sell it. we have to consider all of this. the fact that it is now still in control the commonwealth and use for the public good, that makes a good. host: is this port sustained by revenues
in the george bush white house. he's taking your comments and questions as we discuss syria this morning. jerry is up next from cookville, tennessee. jerry good morning. caller: good morning. the president is talking about the shot in the bow. i find it frightening when it comes to this president and foreign policy. it was a game of chess, i believe it would be a check mate game against this president. he's done nothing but absolute disaster. look at north africa. look at that. some democrats are calling it a success his foreign policy. it's frightening what's happening. i don't see anything that's any good. just think, if he happen to won the nobel peace prize, how bad things really might be. host: we'll go to democratic line, dave is waiting from washington d.c. good morning. caller: peter. the reason that the u.k. not to proceed is because there was a lack of conclusive evidence. in the regions and suburbs of damascus there is not conclusive evidence that the chemical weapon attack were perpetrated by a horrible attack regime. the obama administration has made entirely clear that they wi
of texas does recently because of the leadership though shown by george w. bush, is that when you look at states like arizona, not typical in arizona, but i was just thinking alabama, arkansas' next. if you look at arizona, if memory serves arizona export something like $50 billion a year. if you look at texas can we export $206 billion a year. 35% of those exports go directly to mexico. i think george w. bush understood the tenuous but important relationship that has to exist with our neighbors to the south. i think he was very strategic and smart in building and growing and fostering a relationship over time. and today, texas is benefiting from his leadership back then. a large proportion of the hispanic owned firms in this state and minority owned firms in the state are actually owned by mexican nationals. and so this didn't happen by accident. it happened because very strategic visionary leadership happened two, three decades or a decade ago. now we are benefiting from the. >> creating an environment. >> absolutely. doesn't happen overnight. now you see other states beginning to re
on their taxes. >> up next, george w. bush institute resale the series of discussions looking at immigrants contributions for america. this panel focuses on the economic effects of naturalization. from dallas, this is about one hour. >> a pleasure to be here. i worked for closed with president bush when he was in the white house trying to advance immigration reform in the last battle and so it's a pleasure for me to be back in his beautiful new house, talking about immigration. so thank you to this institute. i want to harken back as we get started to the ceremony that we saw this morning combat incredible moving ceremony because what we're going to talk about here today is not just out immigration is good for america, but have naturalization and citizenship actually even ups the ante and makes immigrants even more beneficial for the united states. to benefit themselves, but it's also a benefit for the country. so the very people we saw this morning when they came in the door, they were great for america but as they went out the door their even more. they will be even more of an asset. we w
andduring during the george herbert walker bush administration, the anti- tank buster rounds that were 1982.ed in we are not totally innocent either. it is hard to believe the administration. i know they are doing their best to settle the conflict in the middle east. is kind of hard when you are just as dirty as the rest of them. you can also reach out to us via e-mail. andy from vernon, new york. thanks for holding on, republican line. taking myink you for call. i want to add onto to what the last guy said. ,f your audience goes to google they are going to find numerous stories where syrian rebels admitted to an associated press correspondent that they were responsible for the chemical weapons incident, which obama is trying to blame on bashar al- assad. the casualties were a result of by mishandling the weapons. they were told that they were not properly trained in handling the chemical weapons or even told what they were. that is where it came from. this is really reminiscent of the buildup to the first iraq war in the 90s when the iraq incubator incident, in which they fabricated story
have claimed and therefore george bush could say don't pay into it, simply give each person the fund and they can invest on their pension. if you monetize your deferred compensation, that is a terrible idea. it further damages the devotee of people to have social and there is a link to having a social wage is that it dramatically is important for the society because then people start to see of objectively the interest is united. one of the great tracks to american history is rather than to countercyclical spending through the social expenditure, it is always been done through the military spending. you spend militarily through bringing the economy back to life. that was the whole post world war golden age etc we've so in that sense one has to confront this idea because it is easy to do the spending on the military because it is already a hari article society in the military and encampment that the more you begin to feel objectively or ties with other people are there you might be able to create a political movement where people subjectively then relate to the common agenda and i thin
, cia director under george w. bush pointed out, many of these groups are really gangs of local thugs using the al qaeda name to build their brand. for washington to announce a grand campaign against them might exaggerate their importance, americanize local grievances and create a global threat that didn't really exist. the terror alerts have probably delighted these small groups for just that reason. the second strategy would be counterterrorism using drones, missiles, special forces and other kinetic tools to disrupt al qaeda-affiliated groups. by anyone's measure, the obama administration has been aggressive on this front. president obama has used more drones each year of his presidency than president bush did in his entire presidency. data gathering, as mr. snowden reminded us. the third possible approach to the threat of terrorism is to try to get local governments to fight the terrorists, but the places that these al qaeda affiliates have sprung up like somalia and yemen are ungovernable. only the u.s. has the technology, missiles and soldiers to disrupt terror plots being hatch
baker had with george bush because -- i don't know exactly the reason, but i said, for example, the other day, the national security adviser went to moscow to meet with the russian president has started arranging a relationship. if i was secretary of state would not have tolerated that. that is my job. and as national security adviser , you're a staff person, not a principle. i remember when general powell got the role. he understood. he came around to me and said, i am a member of your staff. obviously the president is my main guy, but my job is to staff the council. and so i think that is beginning to get out of kilter. in my book have quite a lot to say about the structural governance and how it is going, i think, in the wrong direction. >> host: secretary george shultz, a couple more issues on your mind. number one, demographics. you're worried about demographics. >> guest: i'm not worried. an observant. i see that the demographics of the world had changed and are continuing to change rapidly. the developed countries basically have no fertility. they are getting to be older
of his first pager adress on the watergate scandal, including this call from george herbert walker bush, then the chairman of the republican national committee. >> the thing that burns me up is the feeling that you had and it came through, they don't -- there's so little credit for that. >> the folks may understand it. you see the folks didn't understand the checkers speech but the people did. i mean, the commentators didn't and the commentators didn't understand cambodia but the people did. >> the hell with the commentator. >> presidential historian doug brinkley is a professor at rice university's eisenhower center for american studies. he joins us now from austin, texas. this is classic richard nixon, blasting away agnew-like at the commentators, yet he was probably as right as he ever was in his life when he said the regular people out there like nixon a lot more than the journalists, the elite journalists, ever did, that's for sure. >> these tapes must be like catnip for you, chris. anyone interested in political history, they're quite remarkable. the bit you just played with georg
for. george w. bush had done that i think he would've been, we would've been heard cries of impeachment. we had part of our immigration laws suspended by the president. there's just a variety of issues like that where he has gone outside. we have tension with our system, struggles between congress and the president. this one is very -- i think you'll see it continue. but there will be legal cases. >> i'm going to try to bounce around a little bit but again we will get to everybody. >> i was a little concerned to find that you were not in support of making the continuing resolution contingent upon removing what optional spending you move on obamacare. i feel very strongly. i speak from a point of view -- [applause] >> i think they do, too. >> this is not theoretical for me because two weeks ago today my husband and i paid in cash for our son to have major surgery. but, you know, what? that's the price i paid for the liberty of my children. i'm self-employed. i understand the consequent of that as i've limited options thanks our government on insurance. i understand that i
, not everybody, but a lot of people would agree that president bush, george w. bush, was obligated to strike back against al qaeda after september 11, 2001. we were attacked, and we had to respond. and i think that most people would say that president obama the very right to launch azeinab badawi race that killed osama bin laden. history and diplomacy co-exist. they interact with each other and they sometimes can complement each other. richard holbrooke, the late richard holbrooke, great american diplomat, i don't think he would have been able to secure the peace in bosnia had we not used force for six weeks to demonstrate to the bosnian-serb army that we were not going to permit them to continue to kill innocent muslims. and it was that use of force that achieved the cease-fire and drove them to the negotiating table where holbrook worked his magic and brought peace to bosnia after five years of war. so there are times when we have to rely on our military and we're fortunate, as all of you know, to have extraordinary young men and women in our military and the army and the navy and the air force
is related to the polks and she used their dinner service while her and george bush was in the office. is that true? >> i don't know. good question. >> as our series progresses, as we get it barbara bush, we'll answer that question for you. we'll go back in time and learn about how that political partnership came together. you told us sarah polk was from a wealthy family in tennessee. how did she and james polk meet? >> they ran in the same circles. probably through -- either through andrew jackson or through her own father's family. polk went to the -- graduated from the university of north carolina and then went into law and studied in nashville and became clerk of the legislature and they met there or they met at andrew jackson's because the polk girls were often at the jackson's home. certainly jackson is known or we think that he advised polk to marry her. this is who you need as a wife, he would say. and then it is commonly said that she told polk she wouldn't marry him unless he ran for office but and of course he did and he won and they were married in 1824. >> so andrew jacks
friends. .hey were pretty frustrated they did not like george bush very much. they sure hated losing to him in 2004, even more than 2000. they did not quit. they took the house and the senate in 2006. they never try to impeach george bush. think long and hard. always easier to say try it. usually that means we need to work harder at what we are doing. i am old enough to watch barry goldwater go down in flames. took 16 years to get one old reagan -- to get ronald reagan. democracy is hard work. it is people going out and knocking on doors. is is people going out and voting. .ur system works it is hard to work in part because that is what the founders wanted to be. they are afraid of centralized power. they're going to make this very difficult to do. they're going to have this president for four years that selected this. there's no other system that is is as complex as ours to work and get things through. the founders but it was the best defense for liberty. out.large it has worked i believe that madison came back he would be very happy. sometimes they do. different point of view are s
a while. not just because president obama wasn't tough with him for the several years but even george w. bush. what did he say, he can look into his eyes and i can do business with this guy? >> see his soul, yes. >> see his soul and it turns out that was a lot of bs. i think it's high time and about time. why do you think obama has done this? >> i think obama -- it's a little bit too late. i would have done more. i think obama at long last realizes the ambitious agenda he had for the past five or six years is really going nowhere there's disagreements with every issue, as the previous speaker said. putin wants to use as a punching bag to consolidate his position at home and without obama saying, we've had enough, i'm not going to meet you, and we'll go from there. on your comment earlier, larry, about the g-20, the problem, of course, is that the russians want to use the g-20 and want to restructure the entire international financial system to the disadvantage of the united states. >> yeah, but they can't. they can't. russia is a third-rate economic country. the only thing they have, yo
, for operations are supported, we cut the budget and increased the number of overseas activities, and george w. bush did not run for president -- if you go back to his campaign, he did not run promising a big defense buildup and he was not intending to make foreign policy the centerpiece of his policy, and he ended up making the most fraught decision about the war in iraq. i do not think cutting our military will be the best way to keep us out of trouble in the south china sea. i want steadiness and resolve and let's sustain the rebalance. that means we can make modest cuts in defense. >> amen. i feel like i should applaud. i think that was very powerful on michael's part. i would not put all my eggs in one basket. i want peace through strength or a modern-day version of it because i want a military that deters. i want other things, too. i want strong allies, our partners' capacity to be robust enough to defend themselves if needed and take care of their neighborhoods, so to speak. i want all of our tools of soft power to be effective, partly through the reinforcement from our hard power. i wa
john mccain got great press when he ran against george w. bush in the primaries. in 2008 he was on the other end of that. those things ebb and flow a little bit. i do not think in anyway those are the decisive in the way of presidential campaigns come out. i think if you talk to the romney people they felt that governor romney was unfair at different points along the way. i used to get e-mails about things that were being written or said or talked about. in general, i think those things balance out. in this campaign in particular there was never any question about vulnerabilities or weaknesses in terms of what happened with the economy. in a sense that both of them had had was they have to deal with. host: on twitter -- guest: perhaps so. especially with his medicare plan and his proposal to make a voucher out of that. i don't know it would have been significantly better had he picked someone else. host: jim messina asked to pledge that they do not rerun the 2008 campaign. jim messina explained that in their bid for reelection, both jimmy carter and george herbert walker bus
and increased the number of overseas activities, and george w. bush did not run for president -- if you go back to his campaign, he did not run promising a big defense buildup and he was not intending to make foreign-policy the center piece his policy, and he ended up making the most fraught decision about the war in iraq. i do not think cutting our military will be the best way to keep us out of trouble in the south china sea. i want steadiness and resolve and let's sustain the rebalance. that means we can make modest cuts in defense. >> amen. should applaud. i think that was very powerful on michael's part. i would not put all my eggs in one basket. peace through strength or a modern-day version of it because i want a military that deters. other things, too. i want strong allies, our be robustapacity to enough to defend themselves if needed and take care of their neighborhoods, so to speak. i want all of our tools of soft power to be effective, partly through the reinforcement from our hard power. i want a lot of things. i want economic strength, etc. pointy edge of the spirit is to have this
, therefore, george bush could say, well, don't pay into it. simply give each potential -- each person a fund. you monetize your deferred compensation. it's a terrible idea. it further damages the ability of people to have a social thing. and by the way, the link to having a social wage is that it's dramatic create important for society. -- dramatically important for society. because then people start to see objectively their interests are united. you know, one of the great tricks of american history is rather than do countercyclical spending through social expenditure, countercyclical spending in america has always been done through military spending. you spend militarily to bring the economy back to life. that was the whole post-war golden age, etc. so in that sense one has to confront this idea, you know, because it was easy to do countercyclical spending with the military because it's already a hierarchical society, you know, in military encampments. but society is not hierarchical, and the more you begin to feel objectively that your ties with other people are there, you might be able to
, and that is killing terrorists in mass. the two most hated people in andt are not george bush benjamin netanyahu. it is president obama and patterson. when the egyptians were government,he morsi patterson asked the christian leaders not to take part in a protest. booked -- she was bluntly told to shut up and mind her own business. obama backs terrorists. host: thank you for the call. street9 of the "wall journal." ats really began on july 3 the military deposes president morsi, you can see how the events have unfolded over the last five weeks. ambassador syed spoke here in washington at the institute yesterday, provided a timeline of how things unfolded. it is part of an event that we covered, runs just over an hour. it is available online at our website at www.c-span.org. here is a portion. [video clip] >> polarization of the country. an environment of finances of ,hem, determination, exclusion on a religion basis. fanaticism, discrimination, exclusion, on a religious basis. between whoever is non-muslim brothers and the muslim others, no matter to which religion he or she belongs. for the firs
and much more popular than george bush but that glory is fleeting because they are in an untenable situation where their success is an immediate unfavorable referendum that everybody before them, do they have certain personality qualities and ambitions and visions that make them suspect by their peers. sort of like this 19th century western figure that we see in 20th century films where it's high noon, ethan edwards, the magnificent seven, the man is shot liberty balance. we bring these people in and they are suspect figures and we all want shane to do something to get rid of the -- but it's better he walks out the door. it's better that high noon will kaine takes the bag and throws it down and says i've had enough. whether we like it or not it didn't end very well. themistocles committed suicide in persia. belisarius ended up as a beggar on the streets of constantinople humiliated at his emperor. sherman was called crazy and called a terrorist. he spent most of his post-war career trying to defend what it in a very effective way but he wasn't popular like grant or matthew ridgway.
an issue of some level of hypocrisy in terms of the outrange that was heaped upon the george bush administration with respect to afghanistan and iraq. but there are some slight differences here. one to do with the documented facts of the u.s. of chemical weapons. number two, the general sense that this regime is unhenged and therefore needs to be contained in a way that you didn't necessarily see with the likes of some of the other players over the last few years, whether you're talking iran or whatever. so, i think that there's a different tone that you have with syria that you didn't have with the others. again, i harken back to similarities to kosovo from humanitarian perspective but it does put the democrats in a very ticklish box right now, particularly given the warriness of the american host: jim is on the line from texas. republican line. is whatmy question about this tainted election -- the obama administration. guest: in what respect? irs.r: the guest: the irs is a huge issue. i do not know how that translated in terms of a repressed election. that mightgroups have been
believed that george w. bush needed to go back to congress for reauthorization of the war in iraq. but as president of the united states, he intervened in libya. he had a surge in afghanistan. and he didn't go to congress for permission on either of those. so i think it's a real interpretation of how -- of how you interpret presidential power and whether he has the constitutional authority to do this on his own. but if history is any guide, i would have to say that president after president does act without congressional authorization. i mean, the last time we really did this was in 2002. and so i think that this president's going to say he's on -- he's on firm ground. what he needs to get is public opinion. >> which seems to have evolved since our polling early in may. numbers are dwindling when it comes to support. jay, gloria mentioned iraq. we heard the president make a big distinction on this. he said it would not be like iraq. take a listen. >> if, in fact, we can take limited, tailored approaches, not getting drawn into a long conflict, not a repetition of, you know, iraq,
chief of staff to president george w. bush and a fox news contributor with us from his home in austin, texas. you wrote a piece in the wall street journal, i know you've got a white board, too, so i'll get you to explain it. you call it the un affordable careless act. actually, that was a great line by the headline writer, but my piece was about the unintended consequences of the bill. president obama never sold the affordable care act to the american people by saying, look, this is going to create more part-time jobs in the place of full-time jobs, and yet that's one of big consequences of the bill. if you take a look at it, under the affordable care act a full-time worker is defined as somebody who works as 30 hours or more a a week, and if you work 30 hours or more a week, your employer has to provide you with health insurance coverage. now, this encourages a disincentive to employ people over 30 hours. the number of people who are working 30-34 hours a week has dropped 146,500 on average a month. the number of people working 25-29 hours a week has risen 119,000 on average per mont
not made a decision yet, former president george w. bush is weighing in. >> the president has a tough decision to make and if he decides to use our military, he'll have the greatest military ever backing him up. i was not a fan of mr. assad. he's an ally of iran and he made mischief. the president has to make a tough call. i know you are trying to suddenly rope me into the issues of the day. i refuse to be roped in. >> our chief political analyst gloria borger joins me from washington. you listened to secretary of state john kerry today. you heard the former president, reporters trying to ask questions of him. it's not a matter of what do we do about it, we be the united states? >> i think if you listened to the secretary of state, it was very clear that he believed he didn't need to wait for information from the weapons inspectors, from the united nations. he said very clearly that a u.n. investigators can't tell us anything we don't already know. and between the secretary of state and a background call that senior administration officials had with journalists, it's very clear they b
hardly ever come up. they were attacking dick cheney, attacking george bush with, attacking the fbi and others, nsa had pretty much been unscathed in all this. the only time it really came up as a matter of debate in the intelligence committee was people from the nsa coming forward and saying what a rough time they were having with the fisa court, how hard it was for them to get court orders, how hard it was to be able to follow up on the information they were getting. this is not a rubber stamp. this is constantly scrutinized. it's also scrutinized by the house and senate intelligence committees. i worry saying congress is keeping an eye on it for you isn't exactly a vote of confidence. but, seriously, people on the intelligence committee take it very seriously. i can tell you that this stuff is looked at very, very carefully. so i think we have to keep all of this in mind. i don't see any significant violation of civil liberties. i don't see any significant -- to me, if we have a balanced thought like with zazi in 2009, zazi, and this is one of those forest gump moments where you
dakota, republican collar. caller: do you know the reasoning kind why george bush wanted to -- behind why george bush wanted to sell our ports? host: i do not know you member this. i think he is referring to 2004, the dubai company wanted to buy a port in the united states. guest: i certainly remember that. guest: we believe in privatizing the ports here. i think in the full length of time i decided to keep the state owned. host: what does that mean? guest: the caller i believe was referring to when there was discussion here locally about actually selling the port to a foreign company. that came to a full halt. i thought that was the right thing at the time. you: what does this mean to that this is a state owned entity? guest: it is run and the public good. if it is privately own you have to maximize short-term profit. with government owned we can look at the long-term benefits to the commonwealth of virginia. that is why i am delighted that we do not sell it. we have to consider all of this. the fact that it is now still in control the commonwealth and use for the public good, that makes
capacities when george w. bush was governor of texas. we are really delighted that wen has developed such visuals to help understand the complicated story of finding what did not work so well and how we can do better the next time. we have invited him to make his presentation first. jim has recently finished up his tour at the pentagon. career he was a research research scholar at the national defense university rector of research there. he worked throughout his career on the questions a stabilization and reconstruction including at the un and other success stories in cambodia amid the balkans, and elsewhere. he will speak on his own reflections of what will be the right tools and mechanisms to respond and post-conflict environments. we are very delighted to have leanne smith, the director of the policy and risk best practices services. she has been in that position for years. she has a long career as an australian diplomat and a person who has worked on humanitarian law. we do really want to bring in how does the broader international community handle these questions. they are the c
there were uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. it goes back to the thing we kind of started out with. the federal government is out of control. but it has been predicted by all of the historians that the republic would fail. the question is, how do we teach history, go back, every embrace the thing that made america great? and as i said earlier, i think we have to get in charge. i have been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference. i worked every day trying to do things. i am convinced the only way we do that is half the state start exerting their temporary authority and reassessing -- [applause] -- changes to the constitution that restore federalism in the constitution. and so i think that is the way. you are frustrated. you want to see me in washington. asked my staff. as my wife. i want to pull my hair out. you know, i see two things. i see the constitution, and see what is happening to it. then i see grown men and women who know what the constitution says you don't care. that is what really makes me want to pull my hair out. they
't the same kind of relationships that i had with president nixon that, say, jim baker had with george bush. because i don't know exactly the reason. but i saw, for example, the other day that the national security adviser went to moscow to meet with putin and started ranging that relationship. if i was secretary of state, i would not tolerate that. that's my job. and the national security adviser's a staff person, not a principal. i remember when colin powell got the job of secretary of national security adviser, he understood. and he came around to me, and he said i'm a member of your staff. obviously, the president's my main guide, but with my job is to staff the could be is ill. the council. and so i think that's beginning to get out of kilter, and in my book i have quite a lot to say about the structure of governance and how it's going, i think, in the wrong direction. >> host: secretary schultz, a couple more issues on your mind. number one, demographics. you're worried about demographics. >> guest: oh, i'm not worried about it, i'm observant of it. i see that the demographics of the
and human services from 2001 to 2005. he was appointed by president george w. bush. most recently for the record the governor joined the bipartisan policy center here as a senior adviser and we welcome him very much to the organization. governor, the budget when you took over in 2001 was about $380 billion is my record here. along with social security the was the largest and is the largest still today of the domestic agency. when you left at the end of 2004 it had grown $200 billion to over 580 billion-dollar agency. during your tenure you were hit with a slew of emergencies, anthrax, post 911, concerns over bioterrorism, the flu and the need to stockpile the smallpox vaccine. you also cleared up the plans to expand health insurance coveragn so when i look at your budget i know we are supposed to talk about constrained budgets but one might conclude you had no budget constraints on your agency but omb and barry anderson gave you a budget tie line. how did you go about and did the congress and particularly place restraints under congressional a budget that you hadn't anticipated cl
's an attorney. he worked in several capacities when george w. bush was the founder of texas. the halon affiliation and they were delighted that stuart bowen has developed such innovative and attractive materials to understand. i think it really is held that there's a lot of visual presentation of lessons and iraq and the very complicated story of funding what didn't work very well. and how we can do betterh next te. we have invited stuart bowen to meet his presentations first. we will then turn to jim schear, who has recently finished his second tour of the pentagon as an assistant secretary for responsibility for stability operations in his earlier career he was a research scholar at the national defense university, director of research there and worked throughout his career on these questions of stabilization and reconstruction including at the u.n. and some of its early post of war success stories in cambodia, the balkans and elsewhere. so how did stuart bowen ideas, what kind of responses were there more broadly in the pentagon and the interagency community and his own reflections
uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. i experienced them. he did, too. it goes back to the thing we started with. this government is on -- out of control. it has been predicted by historians our republic would fail. the question is, how do we cheat history? how do we go back? how do we re-embraced the things that made america great? as i said earlier, we have to get in charge. i have been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference, not a big difference. i worked every day -- > we are going to leave this -- i'm convinced the only way we do that is start reassessing real convention changes to the constitution that restore 0 federalism and a constitutional relationship republic. i think that's the way. you're frustrated. you ought to see me in washington. sk my staff. sk reply wife. i see two things. one, i seed constitution, and i see what's happening to it. then i see grown men and women that don't care. that's what really makes me want to pull my hair out. they ignore what the constitution says because it is better for their political care
happened with george bush, of course. didn't call it recess. he called it looking to putin's eye and seeing his soul thinking he could understand the guy and do business. it didn't take him long to find out he didn't really have it right. there was no fallback, after that, i think it was the same situation. of just, you know, floundering about not knowing exactly how to deal with the russians. so yes, it really comes down to the person of valid my putin. it was always a sense of vladmir putin. things have definitely shifted since he announced he would come back and all of, by the way, the processes set in motion inside of russia. i'll thought about later. i think it's shaping very much how putin deals not only in domestic -- politics but foreign politicses. it's the lack of a notion how to deal with putin is kind of in the heart of a lot of these problem. >> that could be hard. he's a unique -- personality. i guess maybe we can sort of follow on that by pivoting off of cliff's point it's a little bit difficult to discern what the american strategy toward russia is. i have a lot of trouble d
criticizing the administration's -- we cut the budget and increased the overseas activities. george w. bush didn't run for president carried back to the 2008 campaign literature he didn't run promising a defense buildup and he wasn't intending to make foreign policy the center of his foreign policy than he wound up making as we know one of the most hardest decisions in history about the war of choice in iraq. so i don't think that cutting our military is going to be the best way to keep us out of trouble in the south china sea. i want steadiness and results and sustain the balance. that means we can make the economies and defense but not cuts like sequestration. >> mackenzie, you're concluding thoughts? >> i think that was very good. there isn't much to add except i wouldn't put all my eggs in one basket is basically the summary. all i want peace through strength or a modern day version of it, because i want a military that the tours. talking on the military front i want all those other things, too. i want strong allies, i want our partners capacity to be robust enough to defend themselves
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